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Have You Had a Lesson with the Student Teacher?

Have you had a lesson with the new Student Teacher? She tells really good stories and includes us in the lessons, too.

Have you had a lesson with the new Student Teacher yet? She tells good stories and includes you in the lesson, too.

 

We have a new Student Teacher this week and next. She's from the Montessori Institute of Atlanta and is becoming an AMI Elementary Teacher and Guide. Our first Student Teacher only got to observe, but Bridgette gives lessons. Here, she's telling the story of The Winds.

We have a new Student Teacher this week and next. She’s from the Montessori Institute of Atlanta and is becoming an AMI Elementary Teacher and Guide. Our first Student Teacher only got to observe. Bridgette’s assignment is to give lessons. Here, she’s telling the story “The Winds.”

The Work of Air experiments prepared us for these stories and charts.  We knew, for example, that Hot Air Rises and Cold Air Rushes in to Take Its Place.

We could tell we would be in the lesson because her lessons are up on the board in the morning, just like Patricia's. We usually follow the plan, or we just change it with an eraser and a marker when needed.

We could tell we would be in the lesson because her lessons are up on the board in the morning, just like Patricia’s. We usually follow the plan, or we just change it with an eraser and a marker when needed.

 

Today's plan included Squaring, "Squaring a Sum," to be exact. Some of us thought we already knew it, and we sort of did, but we loved watching her give the lesson. She gave us jobs, like laying out bead bars, or cutting the tickets for labeling.

This morning, the afternoon plan was “TBA”. It included “Squaring a Sum,” as it turned out. Some of us thought we already knew it, and we sort of did, but we loved watching Bridgette give the lesson. She gave us jobs, like laying out bead bars, or cutting the tickets for labeling.

 

She proposed we square a sum, 4+3, and showed us how to write it.

She proposed we square a sum, 4+3, and showed us how to write it.

 

It looked like this: (4+3)2

It looked like this:
(4+3)2   

 

Then she showed us the use of the parentheses to expand it like this: (4+3) (4+3) and we laid out the first 4+3 in beads.

Then she showed us the use of the parentheses to expand it like this: (4+3) (4+3) and we laid out the first 4+3 in beads.

 

Bridgette explained that the parentheses were like a cup for the beads.

Bridgette explained that the parentheses are like a cup for the beads.

 

The second set of parentheses had 4+3 in paper tickets.

The second set of parentheses had 4+3 in paper tickets.

 

We saw that the parentheses next to each other were multiplied, and, slowly, we each set out the beads for one of the combinations, four taken four times, three taken four times, four taken three times and three taken three times.

We saw that the parentheses next to each other were multiplied, and, slowly, we each set out the beads for one of the combinations, four taken four times, three taken four times, four taken three times and three taken three times.

 

Then we started labeling. . .

Then we started labeling. . .

 

. . .and of course we noticed that four taken four times is four squared, or 42 and three taken three times is three squared, or 32 . . .

. . .and of course we noticed that four taken four times is four squared, or 42, and three taken three times is three squared, or 32, . . .

 

. . .and 3x4 and 4x3 are really the same thing, so we labelled them 2(4+3), so. . .

. . .and 3×4 and 4×3 are really the same thing, so we labelled them 2(4+3). So. . .

 

We put 42+2(4x3)+32 together and got 16 + 24 + 9, or 49 just the same thing as 72!

We put 42+2(4×3)+32 together and got 16 + 24 + 9, or 49— just the same thing as 72!

Bridgette reminded us of some things we already knew and explained some things that were new in a way.  We just can’t wait to have another lesson.

Maybe it will be you, tomorrow!

Do you like multiplying sums of numbers?  We might just try a three or four-addend sum to square, just for fun.

Thank you for reading our blog!

 

 

2017-11-14T22:22:38+00:00By |Classroom Stories, Elementary|