/, Early Education, Elementary/Can You Guess—Can You Find—L.C.M.?

Can You Guess—Can You Find—L.C.M.?

There are many things you can do with the pegboard and pegs. Can you find the Lowest Common Multiple? (also known as "LCM") We can now!

Today were captivated by a new lesson with the pegboard and pegs. It’s a hands-on material with many uses. Can you find the Lowest Common Multiple? (also known as “L.C.M.”) We can now!

 

At the beginning of the lesson, our teacher told us that we would be working with multiples. "I'm looking for a multiple of 2,3 and 4, a very special one, and I'll show you how to do it," she said.

At the beginning of the lesson, our teacher told us that we would be working with multiples. “I’m looking for a multiple of 2,3 and 4, a very special one, and I’ll show you how to do it,” she said.

 

We started small. Two is the first multiple of two, it is two taken one time.

We started small. Two is the first multiple of two, it is two taken one time.

 

We put a small ticket, like a little black line, under the first two green beads.

We put a small ticket, like a little black line, under the first two green beads.

 

Then, we showed the first multiple of three, three taken one time, or just three. . .

Then, we showed the first multiple of three, three taken one time, or just three. . .

 

. . .then, after we put a black line under the three green beads and proceeded to start the line of multiples of four.

. . .then, after we put a black line under the three green beads and proceeded to start the line of multiples of four.

 

This is when it started getting interesting, because we realized we would be looking for a pattern.

This is when it started getting interesting, because we realized we would be looking for a pattern.

 

"I'm looking to see when they all line up," the teacher said. Humm, we thought, that could be a while. . .

“I’m looking to see when they all line up,” the teacher said. Humm, we thought, that could be a while. . .

 

But, it wasn't very long at all. Can you guess when they "all lined up"? At 12! Six twos, and four threes, and only three fours, and we had our Lowest Common Multiplier!

. . .but, it wasn’t very long at all. Can you guess where they “all lined up”? At 12! Six twos, and four threes, and only three fours, and we had our Lowest Common Multiple!

 

We learned how to write the abbreviation for Lowest Common Multiplier, or "LCM," . . .

We learned how to write the abbreviation for Lowest Common Multiple, or “L.C.M.,” . . .

 

. . .and, of "2,3, 4 = 12," and we all recorded it. Simple!

. . .and,  “2,3, 4 = 12,” and we all recorded it. Simple!

Did you know that you can find the Lowest Common Multiple of two-digit numbers using the pegboard, too?

It won’t be long before we are finding Prime Factors and using them as a way to find Lowest Common Multiples of much bigger numbers, but we wanted to share this little lesson, because isn’t it easy?

If you have a pegboard and pegs, you can do this, too, and if you have two different colors of pegs, you can pretend one color is units and one color is tens and you can even find Lowest Common Multiples of two-digit numbers .

We are thinking of Multiples a lot, now, are you?

 

Thanks for reading our blog!

2017-11-14T22:22:38+00:00By |Classroom Stories, Early Education, Elementary|